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Revascularization and Aneurysm Surgery: Techniques, Indications, and Outcomes in the Endovascular Era

Kalani, M. Yashar S. MD, PhD; Ramey, Wyatt MD; Albuquerque, Felipe C. MD; McDougall, Cameron G. MD; Nakaji, Peter MD; Zabramski, Joseph M. MD; Spetzler, Robert F. MD

Neurosurgery 74:5:482–498, 2014 doi: 10.1227/NEU.0000000000000312

Link to free article: http://journals.lww.com/neurosurgery/Fulltext/2014/05000/Revascularization_and_Aneurysm_Surgery__.4.aspx

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Given advances in endovascular technique, the indications for revascularization in aneurysm surgery have declined.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to define indications, outline technical strategies, and evaluate the outcomes of patients treated with bypass in the endovascular era.

METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all aneurysms treated between September 2006 and February 2013.

RESULTS: We identified 54 consecutive patients (16 males and 39 females) with 56 aneurysms. Aneurysms were located along the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) (n = 1), petrous/cavernous ICA (n = 1), cavernous ICA (n = 16), supraclinoid ICA (n = 7), posterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 4), middle cerebral artery (MCA) (n = 13), posterior cerebral artery (PCA) (n = 3), posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 4), and vertebrobasilar arteries (n = 5). Revascularization was performed with superficial temporal artery (STA) to MCA bypass (n = 25), STA to superior cerebellar artery (SCA) (n = 3), STA to PCA (n = 1), STA-SCA/STA-PCA (n = 1), occipital artery (OA) to PCA (n = 2), external carotid artery/ICA to MCA (n = 15), OA to MCA (n = 1), OA to posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1), and in situ bypasses (n = 8). At a mean clinical follow-up of 18.5 months, 45 patients (81.8%) had a good outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale 4 or 5). There were 7 cases of mortality (12.7%) and an additional 9 cases of morbidity (15.8%). At a mean angiographic follow-up of 17.8 months, 14 bypasses were occluded. Excluding the 7 cases of mortality, the majority of aneurysms (n = 42) were obliterated. We identified 7 cases of residual aneurysm and recurrence in 6 patients at follow-up.

CONCLUSION: Given current limitations with existing treatments, cerebral revascularization remains an essential technique for aneurysm surgery.

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